Fruit Crate Label

Fruit Crate Label Fruit Crate Label

Based off the nonsensical logic of Team Fortress 2 and the Ironic Advertisements seen in Fallout 3 and Fallout: New Vegas….now with fewer isotopes and irradiated material.

Advertisements

Genre Gig Poster [Final]

Genre Gig Poster Genre Gig Poster

As far as history goes, the style I made use of is part of a massive  sub-culture known as Anime (manga for the comic book adaptions).  Though normally regulated to both “nerds” and Japanese commercial notoriety, Anime and Manga are technically Japan’s version of American Pop Art (like how DC and Marvel comics are here in America) and have been around since the late 1980′s, initially as short movies and shows to compensate for the economic slump Japan was going through at the time.  As time moved on, popularity for art style grew more popular in Japan and, eventually, the US forming an official subculture akin to the Steam punk subculture. interestingly enough, it has a much larger base here in the US than its origin, Japan, but that’s a different story.  To this date, the subculture and its art has interwoven itself within most of Japan through mass media, especially considering how there’s an entire district of Tokyo devoted to the subculture called Akihabara district.  By my guesstimates, Takashi Murakami is basically like Liechtenstein as they both took their respective pop culture styles (Takashi=anime, Liechtenstein=American comics) and brought them to the art world even further.

Ideas for the Genre Gig Poster

dun100_1201 33.with-reverence TGS-2013-art 1500_2121_0516

These were done by the Japanese artist Takashi Murakami.  Hopefully I can get the Poster to follow the roots of the TGS posters shown.  EDIT/ ADDITION: as far as history goes both the TGS posters and Takashi’s work emulate a well known sub-culture known as Anime (manga for the comic book adaptions).  Though normally regulated to both “nerds” and Japanese commercial notoriety, Anime and Manga are Japan’s version of American Pop Art (like the Liechtenstein comic panels) and have been around since the 1980’s, initially as short movies and shows to compensate for the economic slump Japan was going through at the time.  As time moved on, popularity for art style grew more popular in Japan and, eventually, the US forming an official subculture akin to the Steam punk subculture. To this date, the subculture and its art has interwoven itself within most of Japan, especially considering how there’s an entire district of Tokyo devoted to the subculture called Akihabara district.  By my guesstimates, Takashi Murakami is basically like Liechtenstein as they both took their respective pop culture styles (Takashi=anime, Liechtenstein=American comics) and brought them to the art world even further.